Feedback from states, citizens to shape new education policy

 

  • HRD ministry: Committee headed by an educationist to be set up to finalise new education policy
  • The policy will incorporate feedback from stakeholders, ranging from states to the citizens
  • Aim to make education both an emancipator and an enabler

NEW DELHI: The HRD ministry has said it would set up a committee headed by an educationist to finalise the new education policy. The Subramanian panel’s recommendations were just a “starting point”, it said. The policy will incorporate feedback from stakeholders, ranging from states to the citizens.

In an exclusive interview with TOI on Thursday, HRD minister Prakash Javadekarsaid, “After receiving suggestions till September 30, the committee, essentially comprising educationists, will come out with a draft which will then be sent to the Cabinet.”

The larger philosophy behind the new policy will be to make education both an emancipator and an enabler while looking for ways to en courage innovation rather than relying on rote learning.

“There was some misunderstanding on the New Education Policy as the (work of) Subramanian committee was perceived as a bureaucratic exercise. It was a starting point. The title of the report was `evolution of new education policy’,” Javadekar said.

Explaining the “large deliberation” that took place, Javadekar said 1.10 lakh villages were consulted, more than 4,000 block-level and nearly 500 district-level consultations took place. The `mygov’ platform received 29,000 suggestions. “The suggestions ran into millions of pages. TSR Subramanian committee also did its own consultation,” Javadekar said.

The minister added that even though the report was available on the National University of Educational Planning and Administration’s website and the HRD ministry’s 43-page input was in public domain, a hard copy was sent to each MP. “They should not have misconception that we have finalised something. It is evolution of new educational policy. All suggestions are welcome,” he said.

Javadekar said it was more than 25 years since the policy was last overhauled in 1992. “I believe every generation presents new opportunities and faces new challenges. You should review your education policy. Every country does that and that’s what we want to do.”

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